Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Test

Our doctors have selected the NAAT test, which stands for “nucleic acid amplification test,” to test for chlamydia and gonorrhea. It's the most accurate chlamydia and gonorrhea test on the market today. This FDA-approved test looks for the chlamydia trachomatis and neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria in urine. Throat and anal swabbing are not currently offered.

 

Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Test Information

Is this a blood test or a urine test?
The Chlamydia and Gonorrhea Test is a urine test. When you get to the lab, you'll simply urinate into a cup. Again, there's no need to get undressed or have any uncomfortable swabbing.

Do you offer throat and anal swabbing?
Currently, we don't offer throat and anal swabbing. We recommend you talk to your doctor about receiving annual swab tests anal pap smears. if you're a gay or bisexual man, or you're transgender who practices oral or anal receptive sex, the Center for Disease Control (CDC) recommends annual throat and/or anal swabs.

Will I need to fast or prepare for the test?
You won't need to fast.

What will the results tell me?
Chlamydia test results are either positive or negative. Positive means the test found chlamydia. Negative means the test did not find any signs of chlamydia.

Gonorrhea Test results are also either positive or negative. Positive means the test found gonorrhea. Negative means the test did not find any signs of gonorrhea.

For both tests, it's possible to get tested too early after being exposed. Wait to get tested for at least 7-10 days after a possible exposure for the most accurate test result. 

Are chlamydia and gonorrhea curable?
Yes, chlamydia and gonorrhea can be cured with antibiotics. Our doctors will decide which treatment option is best for you and, if appropriate, will electronically send a prescription to your local pharmacy.

Who should be tested for chlamydia?
Chlamydia affects both men and women. With more than 2.8 million new infections a year, chlamydia spreads easily. Plus, it's common to have chlamydia without having any symptoms. The only way to know is to get tested. The CDC recommends chlamydia testing for all sexually active women ages 25 and under and for women who have a new sex partner or multiple partners. Consider chlamydia testing as part of routine STD screening, especially if you have had unprotected sex with someone whose STD status you do not know or are concerned about.

Who should be tested for gonorrhea?
Gonorrhea affects both men and women. With more than 700,000 new infections a year, gonorrhea spreads easily. Plus, it's common to have gonorrhea without having any symptoms. The only way to know is to get tested. Consider gonorrhea testing as part of routine STD screening, especially if you have had unprotected sex with someone whose STD status you do not know or are concerned about.